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Wood Fired Flavor?????
6eight
http://youtu.be/t...

So I was looking at different roasters one day and came a crossed this video. Since watching I have wondered if there would be a benefit to a wood-fired coffee. I got on the internet and found an article that stated the wood doesn't impart any flavor on the beans, but the heat isn't as dry which benefits the beans during roasting. The article also mentioned it is hard to control a roast, profile, and all that stuff that you normally hear about with wood or coals. I clicked on the next article I found and the author went on to talk about the benefits of a wood fire is the dry heat it produces?????? this just contradicted the article I read two minutes prior.

This led me to ask the question. What (if any) would be the benefits of roasting over a wood fire? Is the heat beneficial? Would it impart a flavor not found in coffee roasted with gas or electricity? I understand a wood fire would be hard to control and be consistent on your roasting. What I want to learn more about is the type heat (chemistry of the roast) and the flavor difference if any. I think I am going to order some coffee from the shop in Buda, TX to have a comparison. Looking locally there isn't much in the way of wood-fired coffee.
?I cook with wine. Sometimes I even add it to the food.? ? W.C. Fields
 
HoldTheOnions
Wood has moisture in it to varying degrees, and the moisture is released during the burning process, so I can't imagine that it's a dryer method of roasting. Never done it, but I've built my share of fires ;-) and I would think it would be easier to get a bed of coals going and roasting after the flame has gone out and then wait for temps to drop to good place or elevate roaster to a good temp or remove coals. Could maybe try smoking them too, put some wet chips on and see what happens. I don't think precision is in the cards, but loads of fun prolly. :-)
 
Ringo
I gave some thought to build a fire roaster. The way I was going to do it was to put in an cold air mixer to imput air to cool the heat from the fire. I think someone on here came up with that idea when it was discussed. I believe it would add flavor but I love smoked food.
All you need in life is ignorance and confidence, and then success is sure. Mark Twain
 
threwitallaway
@ Ringo, you know, back in the '90's there was a company called Clear Mountain Coffee which imported coffee that had been wood roasted (over wood from pruned/old coffee trees no less!) in Brazil, bagged in valve bags and shipped 2-3 day air up here to the east coast.

The coffee was from the Minas Gerais area of the country and did, in fact have a very slight but noticeable wood smoke note to it. Back then I was a "cream-and-sugar" coffee drinker and I picked up the smoke notes through that. It was actually pretty decent coffee from what I remember. A wood fired roaster would(!) likely impart the same notes to any coffee roasted by it -depending on the construction of the roaster of course.

-nate
__________________________________________
Hottop B-2K w barryR thermocouple mod, Mazzer Mini /Super Jolly burrs, Salvatore E-61 group machine, Aeropress, French press.
 
Ringo
[quote]threwitallaway wrote:

@ Ringo, you know, back in the '90's there was a company called Clear Mountain Coffee which imported coffee that had been wood roasted (over wood from pruned/old coffee trees no less!) in Brazil, bagged in valve bags and shipped 2-3 day air up here to the east coast.

The coffee was from the Minas Gerais area of the country and did, in fact have a very slight but noticeable wood smoke note to it. Back then I was a "cream-and-sugar" coffee drinker and I picked up the smoke notes through that. It was actually pretty decent coffee from what I remember. A wood fired roaster would(!) likely impart the same notes to any coffee roasted by it -depending on the construction of the roaster of course.

-nate[/quote
Nate thats just mean LOL. That coffee sounds great and I want some. How could it get better coffee roasted on coffee wood.
Ringo
All you need in life is ignorance and confidence, and then success is sure. Mark Twain
 
6eight
That coffee does sound good. Being a chef I am all about wood fires and smoke. A few years ago I cold smoked some beans I had roasted to see if it would impart any flavor. the first time I tried it I had the vent closed too much and the moisture from the smoke condensed on the beans. The second time I tried it I opened the vents and went much slower. When it was finished I put it in a mason jar and let it rest for 24 hours. When you opened the jar the smoke hit you right away. In the cup is was pretty subtle, but it was there. The aroma was much more pronounced then the flavor, but it was tasty. As with most things smoked I could see the flavors get out of balance pretty quick if you were careful.
?I cook with wine. Sometimes I even add it to the food.? ? W.C. Fields
 
6eight
So the discussion of the wood roasted coffee brought back memories of when I tried to cold smoke a few roasted beans. Since I was at work when I was reading this I figured I would refresh my memory on the flavor. We have an old proofing box used for bread that I now use as my cold smoker. Typically it is a pretty crude set up as I put one stainless steel pan full of chips over another pan with a sterno in it. The proofing box has a fan that circulates air so I don't have to worry about moisture. This is only a few ounces of beans being a refresher. These beans have a little more surface oil starting to show so I need to be careful with the time and amount of smoke. I remember from the last time beans with less oil had a better balance of flavor. The oil will absorb a great deal of the smoke and if your not careful can get away from you quickly.

More notes to come......
6eight attached the following images:
20141031_101409_resized.jpg 20141031_101400_resized.jpg 20141031_101338_resized.jpg 20141031_101310_resized.jpg

?I cook with wine. Sometimes I even add it to the food.? ? W.C. Fields
 
Ringo
I have three different smokers at home so I will have to try this next time I do some cheese or salmon. I have and electric cookshack that cold smokes well with some tweaks.
All you need in life is ignorance and confidence, and then success is sure. Mark Twain
 
threwitallaway
It would be interesting to try the smoking technique on coffees with strong fruit notes; I'm thinking an Ethiopian Yiracheffe Aricha wet or dry process in particular here. As it is, we may cook or bake peaches/apricots in certain recipes, I wonder how a well roasted E. Aricha (with prominent stone fruit notes) would be with subtle smoke notes added to it....any takers?

-n8
__________________________________________
Hottop B-2K w barryR thermocouple mod, Mazzer Mini /Super Jolly burrs, Salvatore E-61 group machine, Aeropress, French press.
 
6eight

Quote

any takers?


If I had some I would smoke it! The smoker we set up is perfect as the constant air movement never let the temp get above 90. It is nice a gentle smoke. We just put some of the smoked coffee in a French Press to try it out. I smoked enough where we could try it several times to determines if rest helps the flavor after smoking. The cup I am drinking now is extremely subtle, but I must say enjoyable. I store the rest in a jar to try over the coarse of a few days. it smells amazing!!!! This batch I left in for about a half an hour. I have a ton of different woods as well so this experiment may go on for a while:)

It may be worth smoking some green beans also to see how or if it affects the flavor in the final roast.
?I cook with wine. Sometimes I even add it to the food.? ? W.C. Fields
 
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